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Screenings

about 1 year ago

What is a screening?

 

A screening is an opportunity for parents and professionals to find out how a child is developing in comparison to other children the same age.

Developmental Areas Screened:

  • Hearing
  • Vision
  • Communicating – How does your child follow directions? How well can your child make himself/herself understood?
  • Fine Motor – How your child uses his/her hands to eat or use a crayon.
  • Gross Motor – How a child moves, climbs, catches a ball, etc.
  • Social/Emotional – How does your child play with other children and interact with adults? How does your child change from one activity to another?
  • Self Help – How does your child take care of himself/herself in the areas of eating, dressing, and toileting?
  • Cognitive – How does your child solve everyday problems?

Ideally, your child needs at least one developmental screening before the age of two, and at least another one before the age of five is essential.  Click on the following link to see the video for state wide screenings.  CDS of Wyoming, State Wide Commercial


Sweetwater County Child Development Center (SCCDC) supports developmental preschools throughout the state of Wyoming.

There are a total of 14 regions and Sweetwater County is number 7. The “1 before 2” campaign is a statewide marketing effort that encourages parents to have their infants and preschool children screened for developmental delays. 

The SCCDC screening numbers have continued to increase since the beginning of this ad campaign in 2003.

Services at SWCDC

about 1 year ago

The Sweetwater County Child Developmental Center (SCCDC) fulfills the mission statement by providing the following services to children birth through five years of age.

Services

  • County-Wide Screening Clinics
  • Individual Assessment by Highly Qualified Professionals
  • Individual Education Plan (IEP-Children Three to Five)
  • Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP-Children under Three)
  • Infant, Toddler, and Family Intervention
  • Early Childhood Education
  • Early Childhood Special Education
  • Speech/Language, Occupational and Physical Therapy
  • Developmental Preschool
  • Individualized Instruction
  • Behavioral Intervention
  • Social Work Services
  • In-Home Program
  • Parent Education
Programs offered by the SCCDC
  • Birth-3 Part C Services
  • Early Intervention, Family Service Coordination, Parent Education
  • 3-5 Part B Services
  • Developmental preschool for children with disabilities

What are IEP's?

about 1 year ago

Individual Education Programs

(IEP's) and why they work:

The writing of each student’s Individual Education Program (IEP) takes place within the larger picture of the special education process under Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Before taking a detailed look at the IEP, it may be helpful to look briefly at how a student is identified as having a disability and needing special education and related services and, thus, an IEP.

Child Find (Screening)
Child is identified as possibly needing special education and related services. There are two primary ways in which children are identified as possibly needing special education and related services: 1) the system known as Child Find and by referral of a parent or school personnel. When Child Find identifies a child as possibly having a disability and as needing special education, parents may be asked for permission to evaluate their child. 2) A school professional or parent may ask that a child be evaluated to see if he or she has a disability. In the case of a parent request the parent may contact the child’s teacher or school to ask that their child be evaluated. This request may be verbal, but it’s best to put it in writing. Parental consent is needed before a child may be evaluated.

EVALUATION
Evaluation is an essential early step in the special education process for a child. It’s intended to answer these questions:
• Does the child have a disability that requires the provision of special education and related services?
• What are the child’s specific educational needs?
• What special education services and related services, then, are appropriate for addressing those needs?

By law, the initial evaluation of the child must be “full and individual,” which is to say, focused on that child and that child alone. The parent must give permission in writing for an initial evaluation and for any tests that are completed as part of the comprehensive evaluation.
The evaluation results will be used to decide the child’s eligibility for special education and related services and to make decisions about an appropriate educational program for the child.
A team of qualified professionals and you will review the results of the evaluation, and determine if your child is eligible for special education services.
If your child is not eligible, you will be appropriately notified and the process stops. However, you have a right to disagree with the results of the evaluation or the eligibility decision. If the parents disagree with the evaluation, they have the right to take their child for an Independent Educational Evaluation (IEE).
THE INDIVIDUAL EDUCATION PROGRAM (IEP)
The IEP team gathers to talk about the child’s needs and write the student’s IEP. Parents and the student (when appropriate) are full participating members of the team. The CDC or school makes sure that the child’s IEP is carried out as it was written. Parents are given a copy of the IEP. Each of the child’s teachers and service providers has access to the IEP and knows his or her specific responsibilities for carrying out the IEP. This includes the accommodations, modifications, and supports that must be provided to the child, in keeping with the IEP.
Before the school system may provide special education and related services to the child for the first time, the parents must give consent. The child begins to receive services as soon as possible after the IEP is written and this consent is given.

ANNUAL REVIEW
The child’s IEP is reviewed by the IEP team at least once a year, or more often if the parents or school ask for a review. If necessary, the IEP is revised. Parents, as team members, must be invited to participate in these meetings. Parents can make suggestions for changes, can agree or disagree with the IEP, and agree or disagree with the placement.

3 – YEAR REVIEW
At least every three years the child must be reevaluated. This evaluation is sometimes called a “triennial or reevaluation.” Its purpose is to find out if the child continues to be a child with a disability, as defined by IDEA, and what the child’s educational needs are. However, the child must be reevaluated more often if conditions warrant or if the child’s parent or teacher asks for a new evaluation.
If the parents do not agree with the IEP and placement, they may discuss their concerns with other members of the IEP team and try to work out an agreement with the special education coordinator or executive director.

REFERENCE:
This summary is taken from A Guide to the Individualized Education Program, published by the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services U.S. Department of Education.

CITATION(S):
34 C.F.R. §300.17; 34 C.F.R. §300.22; 34 C.F.R. §300.101; 34 C.F.R. 300.320; 34 C.F.R. §300.322; 34 C.F.R. §300.323; 34 C.F.R. §324

KinderMusik

about 1 year ago

Who should attend: Anyone birth to three with their caretaker


(Even if your child is shy and quiet, in class they are still learning and may at some point get home and start singing and doing the activities from class).

What is the purpose of Kindermusik: To help the child develop skills through music. While it is not a performance oriented program, your child will learn skills in Language and Literacy, Social and Emotional Skills, Cognitive and Visual-Spatial, Physical skills, and basic music principles.

What is Kindermusik: Listen, Move, Play, and Grow, It’s a music and movement interactive program, It’s a class your child can attend with their peers, The whole family can join in the fun and learning, Classes include playing simple musical instruments, Classes include songs and chants, Classes have story time, Classes provide the movement activities of dancing and group games, Classes will be one time a week, For 30- 40 minutes, New topics will be introduced each week, We will build on those topics the following week.
Topics include: Colors and shapes on the farm, Rhyming around town, Family and Friends, Up in the Sky, Down on the Ground, How do you Feel?

You are your child’s best teacher!
The Kindermusic class will provide you with music, songbooks, storybooks, a musical instrument, games, and family activities to go along with the class activities.
The time you are able to spend on these activities reinforces your child’s in-class learning.
At this age, home is your child’s most important learning environment.